Tag Archives: social media marketing

Top Twitter Spammers Still Going Strong

Since they’ve blocked me on Twitter I can’t get an on-going look at the output of Chris Brogan and Guy Kawasaki, but a quick check-in from a different account reveals to distinctly different approaches to Twitter Spam.

Go check it out for yourself and see what you think.

Here’s what I noticed.

Guy Kawasaki has become click-baiter extraordinaire. Mixed in with 100 or so “funniest video of squirrel” type posts are his original value posts about social media or marketing. But they are usually not original thoughts, just retweets of social media sources. He’s lost all tether to the great brand he was. His 1.47 m followers on Twitter are merely a clickstream.

Spend any time on his feed and you’ll see he’s a bit like the National Enquirer and Buzzfeed wrapped together. And it’s a fact that the man himself is not behind the tweets, no he’s got a staff of tweeters. Not an issue, I guess, if you have become a bot rather than a human. I guess the Real Guy Kawasaki doesn’t have time for Twitter any more. Oh well, what a loss.

Chris Brogan is still repeating and repeating and repeating. And while I’m sure his “offers” and “contests” are good, I’m sure they’re not that good. I think Chris does actually do his own tweets. And mixed in with his repeats

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are also these type of narcissistic questions.

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I guess that’s funny. And 7 people loved it, so who am I to critique?

And in the real world we’ve all got to make a living. So perhaps Mr. Brogan and Mr. Kawasaki are really showing us how it’s done. Errr. Wait. Do you really think either of these behaviors are honest and providing value? Or are they promo-bots? Mere shadows of their former selves? In Kawasaki’s case, he’s not even attached to this account any more. At least Brogan occasionally tosses in an original tweet to mix it up, even if they illuminate his self-importance.

These guys are kings of social media. They’ve written the book on being a Trust Agent and doing marketing right. And yet they fail to follow their own advice. Too bad for all of us.

Read all my posts tagged with Chris Brogan and Guy Kawasaki

@jmacofearth (also seen on Google+: jmacofearth)

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image: spam, twittermania.nl, creative commons usage

So, You Don’t Understand Twitter, Let Me Explain

We need to get a few of the fundamentals straight about Twitter.

Your reach is directly proportional to the number of followers you have. An average Twitter account has around 500 followers. Some Twitter Pros have hundreds of thousands and even millions of followers. Most of us, working in the middle, have somewhere around 1,500 followers. I’ve been working Twitter quite hard since launch, and I’ve got 23k followers. But it didn’t happen by accident. It didn’t happen because I have great content and ask for the follow at the end of every post I’ve ever written. Nope. The simple “grind” of following a ton of like-minded Tweeters, over and over, day after day, is why I’ve built my Twitter following. If you’re promoting your Twitter account but not doing the detail work to build your following, you’re wasting your time.

Twitter growth without an aggressive following strategy will gain you from 5 – 10 new followers a week. And this is from generating a ton of content, a ton more tweets and retweets, and asking for the follow. That’s about all your going to get. And that rate will not get you near your goal, if your goal is reach and influence.

Mind you, Twitter following growth is a pain in the ass.

And if you don’t believe me, well, try it for yourself and see what results you have. I’ve been growing this account for more than 5 years and I’ve tried everything short of paying a spammer for 10k followers for $19.95. I’ve never paid for followers. If you know what a spammer account looks like, you can see why they are of no value.

So what is the value of a follower on Twitter? Why do we do this? What’s so great and different about Twitter?

First let’s break down some simple numbers on your average Twitter reach and influence. Let’s say you’ve done some homework, you’ve been following new influencers, and you’ve grown your account to 2,000 followers. And let’s say you over-tweet and share 10 times a day to get your message out. (I typically tweet between 20 – 30 times a day.)

With the typical 3% reach, we can estimate that each of your tweets reaches 60 people. And if you repeat this process 9 more times, you’re liable to reach 600 followers, and mind you some of them will be overlap. Either way, you’ve tweeted 10 times and you’ve reached a little over 1/4 of your audience. Do you see a problem with our strategy?

You have to tweet more frequently to increase your reach. I recommend using #hashtags to create unique tweets and tweeting them in real-time using a tool like Tweetdeck or Hootesuite. I do not believe in pre-scheduled tweets as these have ZERO chance for starting a conversation. If you’re going to tweet at least do it as a human and not as an auto-bot.

Okay, so you’ve got two new tasks on your to-do list.

  1. Follow a lot more like-minded tweeters
  2. Tweet a lot more frequently, but don’t spam

So how do you find people to follow?

The simplest way is to look at who’s following you and follow who they follow. Find leaders in your industry and follow who they follow. And if you’re lasy, use the “Who to follow” section of Twitter.com and click away.

whotofollow

While Twitter’s algorithm get’s off on some weird tangents, you can follow a lot of people quite quickly by using this little widget.

The real drudgery is the unfollow process. I’ve been using the free version of Manageflitter to help season my list. In the same way, “who to follow” puts all of the potential follows in a little window, Manageflitter can show you a list of “who does not follow you back.” It’s then a grind to click on each unfollow button, but it’s better than trying to do it without the tool.

I often season the list for a week before unfollowing people. And I go through my followers daily and follow back all the real people, who seem legitimate. This is partially to keep them from unfollowing me in the same way I do, using Manageflitter, but it’s also to grow my list of potential influential followers. If they found me they are often real people with like interests. That’s the idea.

Recap: 1. Follow Many. 2. Tweet Often. 3. Unfollow non-followers every week. 4. Follow new followers back.

If you don’t grow your Twitter reach intentionally it will probably not get as big and powerful as it might. Work it.

John McElhenney
@jmacofearth (also seen on Google+: jmacofearth)

What Facebook Reach Looks Like with 2,000 Followers

Let’s get real with the appalling numbers from Facebook.

On an account I started a long time ago, I have 2,126 likes, or followers. Now let’s see how the organic (non-paid) reach looks for an account this size.

99-reach

So for a hot topic, POLITICS, this Facebook group gets an average reach of 50 – 70 views on an account with over 2,000 followers. How’s that math for ya?

3.5% reach. That sucks. Without paying for views, Facebook’s organic reach is a non-starter. It’s fun for play (as I’m not trying to make any money off this account) but you can see, if I wanted to REACH my 2,000 followers I’m going to have to boost a post.

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And once in a while you’ll have a break out hit, meaning it got shared by a few people with large followings. But other than that, you’re Facebook reach is all about frequency and nailing the topic that your followers are interested in.

Your mileage may vary, but the days of 20% organic reach, of just a few years ago, are long gone. Today, building an audience on Facebook is more about building the group you can pay to reach when you have a post you want to boost.

@jmacofearth (also seen on Google+: jmacofearth)